Google testing 2 Labels in Search Results: Quick Read and 5 Min Read

Google tests Quick Read and 5 Min. Read

Google is testing the two new labels in search results. These labels indicate whether the content of a page can be read in five minutes or less.

Google is testing the following two new labels in their search results:

  1. Quick Read
  2. 5 Min. Read

What it appears to be

@Ozaemotion and @lilyraynyc shared the Quick Read and 5 Min. Read labels. Both posted these screenshots on Twitter:

Ozaemotion - quick read -in google search

 

lilyraynyc - less then 5 min read - in google search

 

Short content can be valuable content. Skyscraper content and 10x content have gained popularity during the past nine years. Both were motivated by the principle that “length is strength.”

Many articles on page 1 of Google search results have 1,000 or more words. That is why some SEO correlation studies seem to support this theory.

However, Word count is not a ranking factor. Additionally, readers have grown weary of clicking on articles that cover a complete history of a subject slightly to discover the answer to their query tucked away in a 2,000+ word blog post. 

Also ReadGoogle Preparing A Product Review Update For August 2022

Axios has built an entire news strategy around smart brevity.

Does that imply that all long-form content is poor quality? No. Longer content is beneficial, required, and acceptable in some businesses.

Additionally, there is no need at this time to review your content strategy. Do not update or break up all your stories only because they have a reading time of 5 minutes or less.

Why it matters to us:

This test is crucial to follow since any change Google makes to its Search Engine Results Pages could affect which websites receive hits and visitors. If this Quick Read And 5 Min. Read labels test becomes a feature it might significantly affect overstuffed searches for things like recipes, for example. It also makes sense in instances where a concise response or definition would make more sense than a novella jam-packed with anecdotes and diversions.

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